Tag Archive | culture-shock

What Life is Like in Bangladesh Part 2

What my life is like in Bangladesh is in demand. Many of my online students are still in awe after hearing that we are missionaries here in Bangladesh, I am posting a few more photos I took aroundย my husband’s village years ago. The following informative pictures should give many of you, my friends and relatives, an idea what it’s like to survive in a Bangladeshi village. ๐Ÿ™‚

Brace yourself if you are not so used to facing culture shock. ๐Ÿ™‚ Let our virtual journey begin!

  1. People in the villages still continue to cook using this clay stove.

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  2. Women cut/slice their meat and other raw ingredients using what they call “boti.” No, knives are not commonly used by Bangladeshi women in the villages. ๐Ÿ™‚1915378_1288640861151_6672681_n
  3. Most families in the village own a man-made pond where they can grow their own fish.
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  4. While hollow blocks are commonly used in building houses and constructions in the Philippines, bricks are the ones favored by builders here in my adopted country.
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  5. In the villages of Bangladesh, rickshaws rarely exist. They have what they call “van” and it is the most common mode of transportation by village people.ย In the Philippines, if you hear the wordย “van”,ย you’ll think of a vehicle that can accommodate about 10 people. ย Now, take a look at the big difference. ๐Ÿ™‚

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    I love taking Bangladeshi vans in the village though. ๐Ÿ™‚ It allows you to view the beauty of the green meadows clothing the whole village.ย 

  6. People mourn over their deceased loved ones in their homes and they don’t provide any coffin for them. The bereavedย bury their loved ones’ corpses as they are beside their homes using clay soil.
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  7. You cross the river with wooden boats. In my experience, I remember Jesus and His disciples every time we cross the river by boats.
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  8. Most vendors in Bangladeshi markets are men. They have a very patriarchal society. Take note that men also buy groceries for their families.ย 1915378_1288658061581_7850140_n

Some people pity me upon hearing that as I live in Bangladesh, I have to go through a lot of adjustments. However, I consider it a privilege to be serving my husband in his home country so he canย pursue the call God gave him–to win souls for Christ. To me, going through a culture shock is a cause of inconvenience, yes, but God is working in my heart. There’s a mission work in progress within me and even though I don’t realize what He wants me to do with the experience I haveย been having here in Bangladesh, my calling is to remain steadfast in my faith that He is doing something. His mission work through us and in us is ongoing.

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P.S. I stayed in the village for a year and that’s how I was able to learn to speak Bengali. A year later, I had to face another ย acculturation when we moved to Dhaka. Hopefully, I can share with you a few photos I took around Dhaka so please stand by for the sequel of this post. ๐Ÿ™‚

Also, I hope that this list would prepare you if you are considering to come over and visit us in the future. ๐Ÿ™‚